Silver Cloud - 254 Guests

USHUAIA To USHUAIA

This all-encompassing journey is an explorer's dream. Begin with discovering the wild tranquillity and rolling moorland of the Falkland Islands, before the astonishing landscape of Antarctica hoves into view. Wild, surreal, stunning and yes, cold, to say that this icy expanse that covers over 14 million square kilometres is a bucket list experience is an understatement. Expect to come back a different person.



HIGHLIGHTS

  • Travel to see tabular icebergs in the Antarctic Sound. The Sound usually shows massive continental icebergs, which rise out of the water like giant white-blue blocks. Depending on ice conditions Zodiac cruises and a landing might be possible.   
  • Explore the Antarctic Peninsula on Zodiac cruises and via landings to see seals and penguin colonies. This promontory of land is the furthest-north extension of mainland Antarctica.
  • Visit several landing sites and remains of whaling stations in the South Shetland Islands. This grouping of islands is 75 miles north of the Antarctic Peninsula and holds sixteen research stations run by Argentina, the US, Chile, Spain and several other countries.
  • Pass through the Drake Passage, a 600-mile wide expanse that marks the convergence of the Atlantic, Pacific and Southern Oceans. This is an excellent area for whale-watching and pelagic birding. Look for albatrosses and Southern Giant Petrels, as well as Cape Petrels, prions and storm-petrels.   
  • Enjoy the opportunity to kayak in a small group under the guidance of certified kayak instructors. These special excursions are a chance to appreciate the wilds of Antarctica in  peaceful silence.    

DATES / RATES

Rates are listed per person in USD
Start DateEnd DateVista SuiteVeranda SuiteDeluxe Veranda SuiteMedallion SuiteSilver SuiteRoyal SuiteGrand SuiteOwner's Suite
Dec 21, 2021Jan 05, 202218,09020,97024,30031,50037,08056,25063,00069,930
Rates are listed per person in USD
Start DateEnd Date(Starting from)
Vista Suite
(Mid-range)
Silver Suite
(High-end)
Owner's Suite
Dec 21, 2021Jan 05, 202218,09037,08069,930


ITINERARY

Day 1: Ushuaia, Argentina
At 55 degrees latitude south, Ushuaia (pronounced oo-swy-ah) is closer to the South Pole than to Argentina's northern border with Bolivia. It is the capital and tourism base for Tierra del Fuego, the island at the southernmost tip of Argentina.Although its stark physical beauty is striking, Tierra del Fuego's historical allure is based more on its mythical past than on rugged reality. The island was inhabited for 6,000 years by Yámana, Haush, Selk'nam, and Alakaluf Indians. But in 1902 Argentina, eager to populate Patagonia to bolster its territorial claims, moved to initiate an Ushuaian penal colony, establishing the permanent settlement of its most southern territories and, by implication, everything in between.When the prison closed in 1947, Ushuaia had a population of about 3,000, made up mainly of former inmates and prison staff. Read more

Day 2: At Sea
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Day 3: West Point Island, Falkland Islands
Located slightly northwest of West Falkland, West Point Island is used for sheep farming and nature observations. Peale’s dolphins and the distinctive black and white markings of the Commerson’s dolphin can usually be seen in the waters around West Point Island. Rolling moorland and steep cliffs make for great photographic opportunities, but the main attraction is the Devil’s Nose, a cliffside colony of Black-browed Albatrosses nesting side-by-side with feisty Rockhopper Penguins. Magellanic Penguins and Magellanic Cormorants can also be found on the island.

Saunders Island, Falkland Islands
Meet some of the world’s most incredible wildlife, on the remote Saunders Island. Sitting to the north-west of the Falkland’s archipelago, the British established their first settlement here in 1765, at Port Egmont. Remote, wild and wonderful, the island now serves as a lush grazing ground for plenty of sheep - but it's an astonishing place to encounter far rarer animals - from elephant seals to silvery grebes and Peale’s dolphins. Connected by sinewy links of beach and sandy dunes, which create some of the most dramatic scenery in the Falklands, the archipelago’s fourth biggest island is home to its best birdlife - including a colony of neatly tuxedoed king penguins. Saunders Island's topography tightens at The Neck - where you'll find even more penguin activity. Colonies squark and chatter in huge crowds here, with Gentoo, Rockhopper and Magellanic penguins dipping into the water, and clambering over boulders. A gentle hike to the summit of Mount Richards will take you 457 metres above sea level, offering an expansive overview, from which you can look out across the tips of the moody waves to see Carcass Island and West Point Island emerging. The cliffs to the north of the mountain host rare black-browed albatross - a sight of sheer grace in flight - but comically clumsy at times when landing. Elsewhere, wide lakes are home to various water birds - including the rare black-necked swans.

Day 4: Stanley, Falkland Islands
Tiny Stanley, capital of the Falklands, seems in many ways like a British village fallen out of the sky. Many homes are painted in bright colours, adding visual appeal to this distant outpost. Not far offshore, the wreck of the Lady Elizabeth, is one of the many vessels remaining as a silent testimonial to the region's frequent harsh weather conditions. The islands, also known by their Spanish name of Islas Malvinas, are home to arguably more tuxedo-clad inhabitants of the penguin variety than human residents. Various species, such as Gentoo, Magellanic and the more elusive King penguins, either live here permanently or use the Falklands as a stopover on their migration route. Darwin found the islands' flora and fauna fascinating - no doubt you will, too.

Day 5: Drake Passage
Sailing the legendary Drake Passage is an experience that few are ever lucky enough to experience. The southern tip of the Americas already feels like a wild enough environment – but the sensation of watching the distant cliffs of the peninsular known as the ‘End of the World’ fade into the horizon, is one that’s equal parts epic, eerie and magical. Set sail, to slowly drop off the bottom of the map from Cape Horn, and voyage on an expedition down into the icy underworld of Antarctica. Drake Passage is an extraordinary voyage of romantic ocean faring legend, as you aim for Antarctica’s icy realm. On arrival, skyscraper sized icebergs salute you, as you traverse the waters of this continent where snow and ice dwelling creatures like penguins and whales roam undisturbed. Your first sight of this most-unexplored place will most likely be the South Shetland Islands. Walk in the footsteps of some of history’s greatest and bravest explorers as you explore famed, snow-covered landmasses like Elephant and Deception Island. If the journey across Drake Passage sounds daunting, don’t worry – even in rough seas you’re never alone, and will often be accompanied on this spine-tingling adventure by soaring albatrosses and maybe even a protective pod of humpbacks and hourglass dolphins or two. Converging warm and cool ocean currents attract some spectacular animal life to the passage.

Day 6: Elephant Island, Antarctica
Awesome glaciers flecked with pink algae can be seen approaching Elephant Island — so named either for its elephant-like appearance or for sightings of elephant seals here. Elephant Island is home to several Chinstrap Penguin rookeries, as well as 2,000-year-old moss colonies. Weddell seals and Macaroni Penguins can also be spotted. In 1916, when Ernest Shackleton’s ship Endurance was crushed in pack ice in the Weddell Sea, the crew was stranded here for more than 4 months finding shelter under two upturned lifeboats on the spit of land Shackleton’s men named ‘Point Wild’. The bust of the Chilean captain Luis Pardo has been erected here to commemorate the successful rescue in the tug Yelcho.

Day 7: Antarctic Sound, Antarctica
The Antarctic Sound is a stretch of water named after the first ship to have passed through this body of water from the Bransfield Strait to the Weddell Sea in 1902. The Antarctic eventually sank and crew and scientists had to spend quite some time in this area before they could be rescued. Sites that have to do with this story - like Hope Bay or Paulet Island - are sometimes visited. At Paulet, Hope Bay and Brown Bluff Adelie and Gentoo Penguins breed, as do Kelp Gulls and Cape Petrels, Snow Petrels and Skuas. The Sound’s main attractions are the spectacular tabular icebergs that come from the Larsen Ice Shelf further south.

Days 8-12: Antarctic Peninsula
Remote and otherworldly, Antarctica is irresistible for its spectacular iceberg sculptures and calving glaciers, and for the possibility of up-close encounters with marine mammals and the iconic penguins. The Antarctic Peninsula – the main peninsula closest to South America – has a human history of almost 200 years, with explorers, sealers, whalers, and scientists who have come to work, and eventually intrepid visitors coming to enjoy this pristine and remote wilderness. It is a region of protected bays, unscaled snow-capped mountains, vast glaciers and a few places where whalers or scientists have worked. Just as irresistible are the many Gentoo and Chinstrap Penguin colonies, the seals basking on ice floes, the whales and orcas.

Day  13: South Shetland Islands, Antarctica
Some 770 kilometers (478 miles) south of Cape Horn, the South Shetland Islands are usually the first land seen in Antarctica. Separated from the Antarctic Peninsula by the Bransfield Strait, nine major islands make up the group. The region was the first to be exploited by sealers in the early 19th century, and because of its proximity to South America, it still is the most visited by scientists and tourists. Chinstrap, Adelie, Gentoo and Macaroni Penguins all breed here. In addition, because it is the warmest part of the continent, large moss beds as well as orange, black, grey and green lichens grow –even hair grass and pearlwort manage to survive. Leopard seals, Weddell seals, crabeater seals, Southern elephant seals and Antarctic fur seals can be seen in the water and on the beaches.

Days 14-15: Drake Passage

Day 16: Ushuaia,
Argentina

Silver Cloud (Luxury Expedition, 254-guests)

As the inaugural ship for Silversea Cruises, Silver Cloud epitomises everything that is Silversea. Designed to provide the most intimate of sailing experiences, a Silver Cloud cruise provides 254 privileged guests with the luxury of space and the ability to slip into exotic ports off the beaten path. Our shining luxury cruise ship is often described by returning guests as their own private yacht, their home away from home.

(Click image to view Ship details)

WHAT'S INCLUDED

  • One night pre cruise hotel
  • Transfers (between airport/hotel and ship)
  • Charter flight to/ from Ushuaia
  • Guided Zodiac, land and sea tours, and shoreside activities led by the Expeditions Team
  • Parka
  • Enrichment lectures by a highly qualified Expeditions Team
  • Spacious suites
  • Butler service in every suite
  • Unlimited Free Wifi
  • Personalised service – nearly one crew member for every guest
  • Choice of restaurants, diverse cuisine, open-seating dining
  • Beverages in-suite and throughout the ship, including champagne, select wines and spirits
  • In-suite dining and room service
  • Onboard entertainment
  • Onboard gratuities

 

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DISCLAIMER: Rates are per person and subject to change.



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  • Email: info@cruisenorway.com
  • Address: 373 Broadway, C17, New York, NY 10013, USA
  • USA Toll Free: 1 888 203 2093
  • Telephone: +1 980 498 2020
  • Telephone: +1 910 233 0774
  • WhatsApp Chat: +1 910 233 0774
  • Europe: Mobile/WhatsApp: +372 5299832
  • India: Mobile/Whatsapp: +91 98300 53005